Advocating for human and immigrant rights is a fundamental concern across the divide; many groups have been on the forefront in fighting for civil, human and immigrant rights, ensuring fair representation through the implementation of international standards and also upholding the rule of law.

Michael Lacey and Jim Larkin are co-owners of Phoenix New Times and Village Voice Media, and they devoted the settlement money coming out of their incarceration by Sheriff Joe Arpaio to support migrant rights consortium across Arizona.

From their arrest on October 18, 2007, by Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio, the agreement was $3.75 million. They were taken from their homes at night and detained after disclosing the existence of grand jury case that sought reporters’ notes on articles covering the lawman.

Shocking enough, the main jury subpoenas ordered for the names of citizens who looked through New Times stories online involving the sheriff. The two journalists spent their careers contending and justifying their first amendment rights, took legal action against the county, finally succeeding in the United States Courts of Appeal for the ninth round. Read more: Michael Lacey | Twitter

The Lacey and Larkin Frontera grant will aid groups that champion for civil, human, and migrant rights as well as freedom of speech and civic involvement across Arizona including the Mexican border.

International Migrants Rights Watch Committee, later named Migrants Right International has also been at the forefront of defending human rights and dignity of the immigrants. It was formed in 1994 through a collaborative effort of churches, government agencies, and civil society’s consortiums.

They noted the rise in violence of migrants, that was also propelled by a somewhat restrictive government making it difficult for them access legal protection or support. Migrants are on the rise with many seeking better job opportunities, other being asylum seekers and find it unbearable to carry out their day to day activities with ease and to feel secure.

But because of the state they are in, they are excluded when it comes to benefiting from individual rights and privileges given to nationals. They become exposed to humiliations and exploitations making it unbearable to live a normal life in the country of residency.

Migrants Rights International seeking to bridge this existing indifference by gathering people together both at the local, national to the global scale with the aim of creating awareness of migrants’ rights. As a non-governmental agency, it’s in partnership with the United Nations Economic Council for further consultative programs that address the issues of migrants.

MRI has its headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland and so far it has commenced up to seven global society meetings such as the PGA which is the worldwide action on migration. The consortium is making remarkable strides to address the concerns of about 175 million migrants living across the world.